Looking for Answers about TrafficMaster Allure 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case)?

Customer questions and answers for
TrafficMaster Allure 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case)

The TrafficMaster Allure 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring features vinyl construction and has a country pine finish that looks and feels like real wood. This flooring is stain resistant to help protect the surface from marks and scratches and does not require floor prep or adhesive for installation. This water-resistant flooring installs easily and is ideal for use in high-moisture areas, such as basements, kitchens and bathrooms.
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Customer questions and answers for TrafficMaster Allure 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case)

Question

I want to use this flooring in my bedroom but am concerned about long-term effects of volatile organic compounds. Is this a low-VOC product?

Asked by
magpie
Mullica Hill, NJ
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
July 9, 2014
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Question

How does Allure compare to Core Tec Plus?

Asked by
Sven
Baltimore
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
July 2, 2014
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answer 1
Asked by
Peterbmny
West Long Branch
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
July 26, 2014
Sorry I cant help you out with this matter I don't know the other product but I do know this product and it sure is great!
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Question

Are these planks easily removable and reusable?

Asked by
sandy
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
May 29, 2014
I'm a renter and am looking for a temporary solution to cover the existing old linoleum kitchen floor. When I move out I would have to remove them and maybe I'd reuse them in the future if possible.
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answer 1
Asked by
christina
Florida, USA
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
May 29, 2014
You can remove them by warming the adhesive that holds them together. I'm not to sure you could reuse the removed section unless it was still in a new like condition. I know it is possible to replace any sections that may need it if any damage occurs.
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answer 2
Asked by
Robin
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
June 17, 2014
I would say no, once they are stuck together they are difficult to get apart. You might consider a laminate floor that locks together instead. They can easily come apart.
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answer 3
Asked by
Ace1
Mayflower, Arkansas
June 24, 2014
Removable if one needed to be replaced with a new one, but not reusable.
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answer 4
Asked by
RG01
palm harbor fl
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
May 29, 2014
No they are not. The adhesive on them works very well
makes it hard to separate them.That is why they repel water.You can always cut them out in the seam but then you are cutting off the part that sticks them together.You would have to use some kind of adhesive to stick them back down.If you are thinking of taking up the whole floor and using it in another room I wouldn't.But you can replace a plank if needed with ease.
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answer 5
Asked by
jenny12345
Massachusetts
June 22, 2014
I have not removed these yet, but I can say No, they are not likely reusable. They have a strip of adhesive so each "board" attaches to the one next to it. This adhesive is VERY sticky, but if you do pull them apart, you're going to lose a lot of that adhesion. You probably will end up breaking or deforming a lot of them while trying to pull them apart as well.

They are not easy to pull apart, but if you were to remove them knowing that you will destroy them, I don't think it would be all that hard. There's no adhesive between the flooring and the subfloor, so it will be far easier to remove than traditional linoleum (which is a nightmare to pull up) and probably easier than the peal and stick vinyl tiles. As a renter, its a nice solution because you won't destroy the floor beneath.
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answer 6
Asked by
Peterbmny
West Long Branch
July 22, 2014
Yes but the time is very limited with that transition meaning 15 minutes before removing plank to plank however you can remove the entire flooring because it completely lays on top of the surface there is no adhesive bonding to the subfloor.
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Question

is this vinyl slippery?

Asked by
Carlos
Miami
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
May 23, 2014
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answer 1
Asked by
Robin
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
June 17, 2014
I don't believe it is slippery due to the excellent texture on the planks. It has a real wood feel to it.
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answer 2
Asked by
Ace1
Mayflower, Arkansas
June 24, 2014
No, I have installed it in my and three rental houses. I do not find it slippery and have had no complaints only praise from tenants.
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answer 3
Asked by
RG01
palm harbor fl
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
May 25, 2014
I have this vinyl for a couple of months now and I'ts not slippery.
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answer 4
Asked by
Peterbmny
West Long Branch
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
July 22, 2014
Not at all....it has a grainy's finish .....it is similar to a very well grained wood floor
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answer 5
Asked by
Anonymous
Dayton, WA
July 29, 2014
No it is not. You can glide on it with socks on but not too much.
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Question

Question about transitions

Asked by
Stashcat
Breckenridge, TX
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
May 15, 2014
We need to lay our floor next to carpet and also next to tile. I cannot find any transitions for those areas and would like to match my vinyl floor in the process. The color I have is Country pine. Can you tell me where to find appropriate transitions for carpet and tile?

Thanks

Sandra
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answer 1
Asked by
Rich
Ankeny, IA, USA
May 15, 2014
I have found my transitions at Home Depot and Lowes.
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answer 2
Asked by
THDCustomerSupport
May 15, 2014
Thank you for your recent inquiry with The Home Depot. I believe the best advice would be to talk to one of our many specialty department professionals at your local Home Depot store. For any other questions, please visit your nearest local Home Depot store or call us at HomeDepot.com Customer Service 800-430-3376.
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answer 3
Asked by
Peterbmny
West Long Branch
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
July 22, 2014
Yes as a matter fact I had transitions as you have. The most appropriate transitions can be found in Home Depot in the wood flooring department .....you can match those transitions to the color of pine quite easily.
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Question

Is this vinyl flooring spongy ?

Asked by
kevoogle
granite bay, ca.,
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
May 13, 2014
When I place my furniture on the flooring , will it leave deep imprints of the feet from the furniture because of the spongy type of vinyl flooring?
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answer 1
Asked by
Cindie
Memphis TN
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
May 13, 2014
No - these are not spongy. I have this flooring in my kitchen, and none of the appliances have left imprints on it.
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answer 2
Asked by
Ace1
Mayflower, Arkansas
June 24, 2014
No, firm and comfortable.
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answer 3
Asked by
RG01
palm harbor fl
May 14, 2014
it is soft like vinyl so any weight from a chair leg or so will leave an imprint look for products that you can use for under the legs to avoid imprints
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answer 4
Asked by
Peterbmny
West Long Branch
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
July 22, 2014
Not at all.... it is quite resilient as a "fine" or high floor vinyl floor but not at all "spongy".
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Question

My question is about underlayment.

Asked by
Newby
Sheboygan Falls, WI
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
April 21, 2014
We have a 100 year old home with 4.5" pine board that are dry and splinter a little...plus nails work their way through at times. It is very creeky and there are also better than 1/4" spaces between some of the boards. We will be installing the Trafficmaster Allure Country Pine Vinyl Plank Flooring. My husband has been told we do not need an underlayment but I feel we do. If we do - what kind of underlayment would we use for the type of floor we have?
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answer 1
Asked by
HalsteadSupport
April 25, 2014
Thank you for your question .. my recoomendation in your situation would be to lay a new sub-floor prior to installing Allure. You have a unique situation with nails and large spaces as well as the floor being creeky. The combination of all of the above would lend me to say if you do not lay a new sub-floor I would not install Allure. if you have any additional questions feel free to call 866-843-8453
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answer 2
Asked by
Ace1
Mayflower, Arkansas
June 24, 2014
I wouldn't be concerned but for the nails coming up. I would recommend 1/4" luan screwed down over the existing floor to be safe, however if you decide not to underlay and a nail does come thru you can replace it by simply using a heat gun to release the adhesive and installing a new piece.
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answer 3
Asked by
RG01
palm harbor fl
May 14, 2014
I would use one that is moisture resistant. Also be sure to knock any nails down that are coming up. If they come up to much you might see them through the vinyl.
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answer 4
Asked by
Peterbmny
West Long Branch
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
July 22, 2014
I agree with your previous advice. I don't think an underlayment is necessary. The floor that I had install ed over was pretty much beat up. I would suggest however that all nails are properly hammered down. And that the cracks that you mentioned are filled in using a silicone perhaps or even the product "liquid nails". ....it's a great product not to worry!
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Question

If I end up with too many cases, can I return the excess?

Asked by
SMD1147
Montana
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
April 21, 2014
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answer 1
Asked by
THDCustomerSupport
April 21, 2014
Thank you for your recent inquiry with The Home Depot. Yes, products purchased on homedepot.com can be returned to the store. Simply bring the item along with your shipment confirmation email, order confirmation email or packing slip for ease of return. Most products have a 90-day-from-purchase return policy. Please refer to the following link for exceptions and more information. For any other questions, please call us at HomeDepot.com Customer Service 800-430-3376.
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/catalog/servlet/ContentView?pn=Return_Policy&storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&cm_sp=help-_-2podB2-_-returns3-_-returns_center
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answer 2
Asked by
Ace1
Mayflower, Arkansas
June 24, 2014
absolutely, but I always keep and extra box of the same run number so if the floor gets damaged I can replace a piece or two instead of the entire floor.
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answer 3
Asked by
Patricia
Tx
April 25, 2014
I did return all my unused cases. no problem.
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answer 4
Asked by
RG01
palm harbor fl
May 14, 2014
sure can I did at Home Depot Kept the open box for just in case I have to change one in the future which should be fairly easy to do
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Question

Number of boxes to a full pallet?

Asked by
Matt
KY
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
April 18, 2014
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answer 1
Asked by
HalsteadSupport
April 25, 2014
Thank you for your question .. If you purchase it through the store as an in stock product it would be 20 cases per skid. If you purchase it on-line or special order in the store we stack 40 per skid.
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answer 2
Asked by
HalsteadSupport
April 25, 2014
Thank you for your question, stocking in store is 20 cases per skid. Special order or on-line would be 40 cases per skid.
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Question

Foam backing?

Asked by
therrienm
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
March 21, 2014
Does this have the foam backing?
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answer 1
Asked by
Cindie
Memphis TN
March 25, 2014
No - we pulled up all the old flooring and laid it over a 1925 subfloor, and it worked out great!
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answer 2
Asked by
Patricia
Tx
April 25, 2014
no foam backing. I was concerned about it but now that it is on floor it was not needed. it is nice.
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Question

Would a cork underlayment work well with this Allure product?

Asked by
varlab
Lancaster, MA
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
September 15, 2013
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answer 1
Asked by
sfsurfdude
Stockton, CA, USA
October 11, 2013
Not especially...
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answer 2
Asked by
MacGyverDB
Galloway, Ohio
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
November 3, 2013
would not recommend it....remember this is vinyl. move it back and forth enough it will still break.
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answer 3
Asked by
Bill
Virginia
January 7, 2014
If your subfloor is level, you do not need an underlayment. If it is not, a cork or foam(less expensive) underpayment is needed.
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answer 4
Asked by
DesigningWoman
October 3, 2013
Hello varlab and thank you for your question.

No underlayment is needed unless it is installed over concrete, when only a 6 mill poly underlayment is required. The cork underlayment may provide too much cushion and is not suitable as an underlayment for the Traffic Master 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring . The “cushion” will cause separation of the grip strips and result in failure of the floor.

Best wishes on your project.
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answer 5
Asked by
mombot1
Illinois
October 13, 2013
I do not think any underlayment is required unless you have a bad floor already down or you already have cork down. This flooring was installed directly over a vinyl tile floor and looks just fine. I suppose cork would reduce noise for the room below but if that is not a factor, why spend the extra money?
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Question

How should I transition from tile with a curved corner?

Asked by
Jools
Clearwater FL
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
August 20, 2013
How should I transition from tile with a curved corner?
The curve is about 9x9" (a quarter of an18" diameter circle let's say).
Also, the tile is .25" thick and the Allure is .15 thick, so there is a height difference.
I'm afraid the vacuum could chip the tile if I don't treat this properly.
Thanks for your help.
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answer 1
Asked by
ScubaPete
Virginia
August 20, 2013
You could cut the Allure very carefully, using a template to guide you. If you're talking about such a small difference in thickness/height, then use a thin spacer under the edge of the Allure to even it out with the tile. If it is really only 1/10th of an inch, then it shouldn't be a problem
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answer 2
Asked by
Granny
WV
August 22, 2013
I am not sure that I have all the information needed to produce a practical answer to your question.
Are you attempting to begin tiling where two rooms meet? Do you have an "open" floor plan without doorways, or have you added a new room to the existing structure ? If you begin the new tile at a doorway into another room, they make junction strips in wood and metal that are made to accomodate the differences in height of the flooring. If you are putting down new flooring in a cuved area, I am not sure how you would maintain the changes in height without replacing your original tiles with Allure also.
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answer 3
Asked by
MacGyverDB
Galloway, Ohio
November 3, 2013
put the piece, if possible, in position next to the curve, and use a compass to transfer the curve. Use a utility knife to carefully work the curve. Use many passes and don't try to remove it all at once.

Once cut and fitting, and the floor is done. Get a small tube of clear Silicon caulk. A small bead up next to this won't be visible and it will keep things from getting in. It's what I used between my patio door and the new floor.
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answer 4
Asked by
Bill
Virginia
January 7, 2014
You could try using an expoxy grout to form a seam that tapers down from your tile to the flooring.
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answer 5
Asked by
Jools
Clearwater FL
August 21, 2013
More specifically, how do I cover the gap between the two surfaces? Is there a curvaeable transition strip? The vinyl is cut with impressive accuracy, but it still needs some sort of finishing. Is caulking the only solution? What material? I'm hesitant to do that because it seems like it would break down with wear (right inside the front door).

What spacers are you referring to? Is that an Allure product, or what should I ask for?

Thanks.
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Question

A few of my planks have bare areas about 6 inches long (No sickiness on the glue strips). Is there a glue I can buy to put on those areas?

Asked by
CarrieR
Ilion NY
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
August 8, 2013
If glue is not the answer, will the attaching planks grip strips be enough to secure the defective plank?
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answer 1
Asked by
MacGyverDB
Galloway, Ohio
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
November 3, 2013
use the warranty...they ought to replace what was defective.
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answer 2
Asked by
Bill
Virginia
January 7, 2014
I believe that if you use a 100 lb. floor roller going in both directions across your floor after installation the seams will seal. You can rent these at equipment rental centers.
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answer 3
Asked by
gmabunny3
Kansas, USA
August 9, 2013
we are using liquid nail on the stairs since no strips will fit the area.
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answer 4
Asked by
Granny
WV
August 9, 2013
If we had encountered this problem, I am sure my husband would have gathered up the box of defective tiles and returned them to Home Depot in exchange for another box that had all the glue strips intact. Home Depot needs to be aware of defective merchandise ASAP so that they can notify the company who produces the tiles to be aware of the defect. You could buy a type of glue that is made specifically for vinyl tile and apply it to the strips that are lacking any adhesive, but I think most stores would prefer to replace the entire box of tiles so they could ship them back to the company for replacement. Home Depot doesn't want unhappy customers and are willing to immediately fix any problems you might have, rather than expect the customer to spend his own money to fix it.
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answer 5
Asked by
SBarnes
January 15, 2014
Duct tape with sticky side up works great
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Question

We installed Allure country pine flooring in a bedroom, bathroom, hallway and laundry room. After a few days, we noticed small strips in several

Asked by
amyann123
Charlotte, NC
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
July 28, 2013
spots. they are about 12" long and 1" wide and kinda look like glue, but they are not sticky and we can't get them off. Any ideas or anyone else had this problem?
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answer 1
Asked by
MacGyverDB
Galloway, Ohio
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
November 3, 2013
if the stripes line up with the glue stripe overlap, then you might have either an uneven floor under it and it's been worked enough to break off or you have a batch of bad product.
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answer 2
Asked by
Granny
WV
July 29, 2013
If the defect wasn't already there before you installed the flooring, something has happened during or right after you installed the floor to create the "strips". I would attempt to remove the defect by using a solvent such as: Alcohol or a product called, "Goof Off", and a soft cloth, to remove what looks like glue from your vinyl tile. You need to question the installer of your tile to decide what might be causing the problem; mis-handling of any product can result in defects that would be difficult to repiar.
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answer 3
Asked by
gmabunny3
Kansas, USA
August 9, 2013
no problem with ours. we have had some for 3 years, another room done last summer, and putting on a stairs with liquid nails.
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Question

How do I clean and maintain my allure flooring

Asked by
Ruth
Holly. MI
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
July 11, 2013
Just put down allure traffic master traditional oak amber flooring. Don't know what to use for cleaning.
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answer 1
Asked by
Granny
WV
July 12, 2013
It's pretty simple; you sweep any loose dirt off with your vacuum, then you mop up any stains as you would any vinyl flooring. You don't need to wax it. The beauty of this floor is; it rarely shows dirt. If you install a very dark color of vinyl, you will need to vacuum more often because it shows light-colored dust, and pet hair. I have the medium-toned vinyl, and it rarely shows any kind of dirt.
LOVE IT !!!!!
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answer 2
Asked by
DIYMAMA
Maine
July 12, 2013
Allure makes a cleaner and polisher in one product that works great with no build up. it is easy to use. Love it
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answer 3
Asked by
MacGyverDB
Galloway, Ohio
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
November 3, 2013
My wife just uses a duster with some basic cleaner on it. Wet messes we just clean up quickly.
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answer 4
Asked by
Bill
Virginia
January 7, 2014
We use swiffer wet
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answer 5
Asked by
gmabunny3
Kansas, USA
August 9, 2013
mild soap and water does the trick for us. spot clean with wet rag
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answer 6
Asked by
skiesofblue
Arizona
October 8, 2013
I don't know what is recommended but I have used a hoover hardwood mopvac with the cleaning solution, vinegar solution and water with a microfiber mop all on different occasions and have not had issues with any of them.
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Question

Should I lay the Trafficmaster planks with or against my existing old wood plank floor?

Asked by
CarrieR
Ilion NY
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
July 1, 2013
The original floor has 1/8 inch gap between planks.
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answer 1
Asked by
Granny
WV
July 2, 2013
If you are installing the vinyl floor in just one room, or two adjacent rooms, with the same old wood plank subfloor, I would definately advise you to lay the new floor running the opposite direction from the old plank flooring. With that much space between the old floor boards, there is probably a lot of movement when you walked across the old floor; if you laid the new flooring directly above the old boards that move when pressure is applied, you would probably cause the adhesive that adheres the new floor together to become separated where the subfloor moves downward with pressure. i would recommend that, if possible, you secure any of the old plank flooring that is loose enough to cause squeaking, or excessive movement due to pressure from foot traffic or large pieces of furniture placed on top of it before you try to lay new flooring. This requires screwing the loose floor boards to a stable piece of lumber just beneath it to make the sub floor as smooth as possible. This will allow you
to place your new vinyl flooring on a solid surface that is necessary to maintain the quality of the new flooring !
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answer 2
Asked by
Lynn
Aiken, SC
August 9, 2013
If your existing floor is stable, I would install the new flooring planks in the direction that is most aesthetically pleasing for the room's shape, size and its proximity to other rooms (for example a master bath to bedroom). Try laying out a few planks in an area that will be most visible upon entering the room. Place few "practice" run planks in one direction, then stand back and look at it. Then, place them in the other direction to see which you prefer. Also, you will be able to see how light plays off of the floor in each direction and how the layout looks as it co-relates to flooring in other rooms that might be visible from the room in which your installation is taking place. Since the floor "floats" it is quite easy to pick these few planks up and move them to decide what works best for your room and you!
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answer 3
Asked by
MacGyverDB
Galloway, Ohio
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
November 3, 2013
depends on the rest of the room...and your tastes. As long as the other flooring is very secure...using screws not nails...shouldn't matter.
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answer 4
Asked by
ScubaPete
Virginia
July 5, 2013
As long as the existing floor is smooth and solid, it can be laid in any direction. The 1/8" spaces should not be a problem. The planks are made in two layers with about a one inch overlap so one plank seals tightly to the next one.
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answer 5
Asked by
DIYMAMA
Maine
July 9, 2013
Lay it right over the original floor, I used a padding under mine
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answer 6
Asked by
gmabunny3
Kansas, USA
August 9, 2013
the flooring floats on top, estimate your planks an see which is a better layout.
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Question

Installation on concrete slab home

Asked by
sgilbert
CHampaign
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
June 9, 2013
Pulling up carpet and pad on a slab home. DO I need a sheet of visqueen under the Allure?
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7 answers
Answers
answer 1
Asked by
Granny
WV
June 10, 2013
To install this anywhere, the subfloor needs to be leveled. If there are dips, or small humps in the sub-floor, you will need to use a concrete mix that self-levels over the areas that need it. You would need to allow time for this to set up completely before you lay down a rubberized mat beneath the vinyl tile. Because each tile is adhered to the next tile, and not the sub-floor, it is necessary to allow the tiles to be flexible under foot. There are several kinds of mats available that will provide a surface that give the tiles room to flex. This is why this vinyl tile feels more comfortable to walk on than hardwood flooring.
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answer 2
Asked by
Petra
June 10, 2013
No. I did the same and allure has it already so I laid it directly on the cement slab
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answer 3
Asked by
Lynn
Aiken, SC
August 9, 2013
You can place the barrier between the concrete and flooring, but it is probably not necessary, since this flooring uses a "floating" type of installation and can be installed over most sub-surfaces. The main thing is to ensure that your floor does not have any obvious dents and/or bumps, staples, nails heavy adhesive spots, etc., as these could show through on your finished product. If you have a problem with a very uneven concrete slab, you might want to apply a liquid leveling agent designed for this purpose before you begin to install your new floor. If the concrete is level and in good condition, you should be able to go ahead with installation over it.
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answer 4
Asked by
MacGyverDB
Galloway, Ohio
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
November 3, 2013
they make special underlayment for concrete floors that allows the floor to breath...use that else you will have issues with mold later on.
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answer 5
Asked by
Ravyn
Oak Grove, MO, USA
June 10, 2013
My home is not on a concrete slab. A friend did install on a slab and is very happy with it. He has had it for 2 years and it still looks like new. He did not have any sub flooring of any kind put down.
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answer 6
Asked by
ScubaPete
Virginia
June 10, 2013
As long as you didn't have a moisture problem under the carpet you should be fine. That being said, an additional barrier may be a good idea as well.
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answer 7
Asked by
skiesofblue
Arizona
October 8, 2013
I installed right on top of a concrete slab. The only issue we had (that we really didn't care about) was the concrete seams were very large and uneven, they show through if you are looking for them.
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Question

Is this a peel/stick product? Where is it made?

Asked by
Annie
Arizona
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
April 29, 2013
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6 answers
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answer 1
Asked by
HalsteadSupport
May 22, 2013
This is a grip strip product. There are tabs on the end of the long and short side that stick to each other and not the floor
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answer 2
Asked by
Lynn
Aiken, SC
August 9, 2013
This is not a "peel and stick" product, in that there is no peeling. There is a type of paper, similar to parchment paper, in between the planks in the box that the planks come in. This keeps the adhesive areas on planks from sticking together with one another. Each adhesive strip is not very sticky, individually. The real adhesion occurs when the adhesive strip of one plank is positioned to "butt" up with the next plank to be installed. This is when the permanent bond begins to take place.
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answer 3
Asked by
ScubaPete
Virginia
April 30, 2013
There is no "peel" but it does stick together nicely. It seems to be some type of contact cement on both sides that isn't sticky to the touch, but bonds together when both pieces are put together. It doesn't adhere to the underlying floor, but all the pieces stick to each other.

Mine was made in China.
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answer 4
Asked by
Granny
WV
May 1, 2013
This vinyl flooring doesn't stick to anything but the next piece of vinyl flooring. It has a strip of vinyl on the sides that is coated with adhesive; you peel the protective paper covering off the adhesive strip and press it firmly to the next vinyl tile. At no point is the vinyl tile adhered to the old flooring beneath it; that is why it is referred to as "floating vinyl tile'. You remove the baseboard strips around the room in preparation for laying the vinyl tile. Once the room is covered with the tile ( clear up to where the floor meets the wall), you are ready to reinstall your baseboard, which will anchor the vinyl tile all the way around the room ! I think this is an American-made product !!!!
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answer 5
Asked by
gmabunny3
Kansas, USA
August 9, 2013
not a true peel and stick. only the edges overlap and stick. floor floats over what is covers
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answer 6
Asked by
skiesofblue
Arizona
October 8, 2013
They adhere to each other not the floor. So yes, they are peel & stick but not to the floor. I don't know where it is made.
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Question

Is Allure vinyl flooring suitable to install over radiant heat?

Asked by
Lana
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
April 21, 2013
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3 answers
Answers
answer 1
Asked by
Granny
WV
April 22, 2013
Any vinyl is subject to warping due to extreme temperatures. I am not familiar with the amount of heat that eminates from Radiant Floor heating, but it would seem that any heat source that is encased in vinyl flooring would produce enough heat to melt the glue that holds the vinyl flooring together. If your glue fails, your floor will return to it's original condition....vinyl pieces waiting to be glued together to produce a solid surface on which to walk. I could not recommend placing this vinyl flooring directly above a heat source.
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answer 2
Asked by
HalsteadSupport
May 24, 2013
as long as the radiant heat does not exceed 85 degrees
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answer 3
Asked by
MacGyverDB
Galloway, Ohio
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
November 3, 2013
I would not try it. We were warned of using steam cleaners on the floor because it would cause the glue to melt and separate the tiles...constant heat from the under side would likely do the same thing.
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Question

I do not heat my house in winter in PA. Wil this product withstand the cold?

Asked by
Mary
NE Pennsylvania
about 6 in. x 36 in. Country Pine Resilient Vinyl Plank Flooring (24 sq. ft./case) on
April 14, 2013
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3 answers
Answers
answer 1
Asked by
Granny
WV
April 15, 2013
I am assuming that you don't live in this un-heated house in the winter time ! If you don't walk on the floors again till spring, it is safe to say that the floors will be fine till warm weather returns. Cold and freezing temperatures are hard on the contents of any home that is not heated; the vinyl floors would probably crack under these extreme temperatures " only if you put pressure on them". You have probably noticed the damage to other parts of your household due to the freezing temps; these vinyl floors are quite resilient and should last you many years, even under these unusual conditions !
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answer 2
Asked by
MacGyverDB
Galloway, Ohio
Home Improvement Profile: DIYer
November 3, 2013
should. Once it's installed it ought to be ok. A gradual increase in heat towards the summer time would be ok. As well as gradual decreases in heat. Just be careful of pipes in PA winters. This may repel water, but water left on it that has frozen and thawed likely won't be covered by the warranty.
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answer 3
Asked by
gmabunny3
Kansas, USA
April 15, 2013
Depends on how cold I imagine. I live in KS and the floor temps get in the 50's in winter.
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