Looking for Answers about GE SurgePro Surge Arrestor?

Customer questions and answers for
GE SurgePro Surge Arrestor

Protect computers, televisions, appliances and other sensitive electronic equipment from destructive power surges by installing the GE SurgePro Surge Arrestor. This surge arrestor is best mounted at your home's service entrance and is compatible with any brand load center. With a 60,000 amps peak surge current rating, this surge arrestor provides reliable protection.
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Customer questions and answers for GE SurgePro Surge Arrestor

Question

TELL ME WERE EACH WIRE GOES PER COLOR CODE,THANKS

Asked by
wombat
DALLAS,NC
about SurgePro Surge Arrestor on
May 14, 2014
NO INSTRUCTIONS
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answer 1
Asked by
DesigningWoman
May 20, 2014
Hello wombat and thank you for your question.

Follow the instructions for model THSASURGE60 located here: http://apps.geindustrial.com/publibrary/checkout/DET-734?TNR=Brochures|DET-734|generic.

Best wishes on your project.
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Question

How do I connect the GE THSASURGE60 to my 220v 30 amp breaker if I do not have a double breaker?

Asked by
Rene
Philippines
about SurgePro Surge Arrestor on
August 22, 2013
Would using a pigtail be ok? One of my breakers is flushed into the wall without any more space inside the breaker. My aircons (split-type) are connected to dedicated separate breakers. How best can I install the GE THSASURGE60. Thank you for your assistance.
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answer 1
Asked by
2manyinterests2
Belleville, IL
December 31, 2013
The Surge Protector must be the only device on the breakers. The two breakers do not need to have a common trip, but the 2 breakers must be on alternative phases. So, using two single-pole breakers separated by several inches is OK. If your breaker box is full and can't be reorganized, you need to consider alternatives: (1), no Surge Protector; (2), upgrade breaker box; (3), buy a surge protector from your utility that mounts under the meter in the meter base.
There is about 2 feet of wire on each lead of the surge pro and it is important to keep this distance short. As lightning enters the box, it will get distributed to all circuits as a function of their resistance to ground. If the Surge Protector is the shortest lead and its ground leads are attached to a nearby ground rod, the lightning will flow through the Surge Protector to the ground rod and the other circuits will be protected. If the leads to the Surge Protector are long or the ground is some distance away or of poor quality, the other circuits may suffer a lightning strike.
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answer 2
Asked by
THDCustomerService
Atlanta, GA
September 9, 2013
Hi Rene,

Thank you for your question.

The MFG confirms that This unit requires a 2 pole breaker (60A or less) to be installed. Unfortunately no other way to hook it up.

For any other information on this product, please call our online Customer Support at 800-430-3376.
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Question

is this product rated for outdoor use ?

Asked by
Fitz
about SurgePro Surge Arrestor on
August 5, 2013
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answer 1
Asked by
2manyinterests2
Belleville, IL
December 31, 2013
No, It is rated NEMA Class 1. Outdoors requires NEMA Class3R
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answer 2
Asked by
DesigningWoman
August 9, 2013
Hello Fitz and thank you for your question.

The GE SurgePro Surge Arrestor (Model # THSASURGE60) is designed to be installed in or next to your GE load center – indoors only. Installation information can be found here: http://www.geindustrial.com/publibrary/checkout/DET-734?TNR=Brochures|DET-734|generic.

Best wishes on your project.
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Question

External Breaker options

Asked by
AmithG
Atlanta, GA
about SurgePro Surge Arrestor on
September 7, 2012
Hi. I do not have any space circuit breakers in my 150A panel, but would like to add it to the 50A breaker on the top left in the photo (share it with the red/black). Is installing it on an external breaker a better option? If so, how do I install an external breaker?
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answer 1
Asked by
THDCustomerService
Atlanta, GA
September 12, 2012
Hi Amit,

Thank you for your question.

According to the manufacturer, you can use a 2 pole 60A breaker or less, please click on the below URL for the install instructions manual.

www.geindustrial.com/publibrary/che...

Hope this information helps.
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answer 2
Asked by
2manyinterests2
December 31, 2013
The Surge Pro should be mounted as close to the main circuit breaker as possible with as short of leads as possible. I would add an auxiliary panel and move the lines from the breaker on the top right of your current panel to the auxiliary panel. Then I would mount the Surge Pro to the breaker on the top right of the current panel.
An auxiliary panel is relatively easy to add. Get a small panel with main lugs and room for at least 4 full-size breakers. Replace the two-pole breaker on the lower right of your old panel with a sufficiently large breaker to supply the new panel. Using conductors sized for the appropriate amperage, connect from the new breaker in the old panel to the main lugs in the new panel. Make sure that you follow all conduit, grounding, and bonding requirements for your area.
To ensure proper operation of the Surge Pro make sure that you have good grounding. I needed to add a ground rod in the installation at my house.
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Question

How does this device do what it does?

Asked by
JDitto
Arllington, TX
about SurgePro Surge Arrestor on
September 4, 2012
More of a curiosity, but I'm looking into these for my home and this appears to be the one to do with. How does it arrest the surge though? Are you attaching this directly to the incoming supply lines via the breaker or is it simply pulling the power away from the home when it needs too? From what I see it just hooks in with it's own breaker and doesn't matter where in the box it goes, but how does it stop the surge like that?
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answer 1
Asked by
Tangelo
Chicago
September 6, 2012
Hello this is Tangelo from the Home Depot Community!

AC power surge protection for the entire home or office – computers, TV, appliances and all other
sensitive electronic equipment

• Protects against dangerous lightning and utility produced
power surges
• Installs in or next to your GE load center (the best
location for protecting all AC circuits in your home)
• Up to 60,000 amps of surge protection
• Meets newest UL 1449 3rd edition surge protection
requirements

Warranty covers damage for a minimum of 2 years and $15,000

http://www.nooutage.com/pdf/GE-THQL...

I hope this helps, if you have any more questions you can find me on our website at community.homedepot.com
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answer 2
Asked by
2manyinterests2
December 31, 2013
The Surge Pro contains several electronic components that are typically called surge absorbers such as the ZNR devices offered by several manufacturers. When a voltage exceeds an established value, the ZNR resistance decreases to a very small value and effectively shorts its leads together. The GE Surge Pro actually contains several ZNRs between the line leads, each line lead and neutral, and neutral and ground.
The breaker connects the Surge Pro to the line buses in the breaker box and significant power only flows through this breaker when a voltage surge occurs. (It is likely to trip when the surge occurs and if the surge is large enough, the Surge Pro needs to be replaced.)
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Question

Why a 60A breaker

Asked by
Jim
about SurgePro Surge Arrestor on
August 2, 2012
The instructions say connect to a 2-pole 60A breaker (or less) I understand 2 pole, that gets both legs of the power coming in, but I don't understand why 60A. If I use a smaller breaker, say 30A, will I be protected less? (other than once the breaker trips, the surge protector is no longer connected)
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answer 1
Asked by
Newf
Schaumburg, IL
August 3, 2012
Hello Jim, I’m Newf from the Home Depot’s how-to Community. Thank you for your question.

The limit of 60 amps is based on both the unit itself and the wires connecting the unit to the breaker. You can use a smaller breaker but not a larger one. Since there is little or no cost difference I don’t know why you would want to limit the total surge protection energy potential by using a smaller breaker.

I hope this helps,
Newf.

.
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Question

Which UL 1449 edition does this device meet?

Asked by
gc
Minneapolis, MN
about SurgePro Surge Arrestor on
May 2, 2012
The images show it meets the old UL 1449 2nd edition. Does home depot carry the devices with the 3rd edition labeling? Also, does anyone know if GE even made any changes to the internal construction of the devices between the 2nd and 3rd edition labeling? thanks.
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answer 1
May 3, 2012
Hello Valued Home Depot Customer,
Thanks for your question and interest in this item. More information is needed to accurately answer your question. Please contact our Online Customer Service Department at 800-430-3376 to get more assistance with this item. Our hours of operation are between 6:00 a.m. and 2:00 a.m. Eastern Time daily.
Thanks.
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Question

Specifications and Accessories

Asked by
Bill
Washington
about SurgePro Surge Arrestor on
December 23, 2011
- What is the length of the surge protector/arrestor conductors? Can they be lengthened?
- Is there a faceplate or enclosure available for the surge protector?
- How does the surge protector mount to a surface?
- What is the lowest amperage circuit breaker allowed that will still ensure full operation of the surge protector?
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3 answers
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answer 1
Asked by
KeithJM
Albany, NY, USA
February 10, 2012
The pigtail is about 18", which should be long enough to mount the unit in a side knockout on your power panel and reach a 220v breaker. It's best not to lengthen the wires, and they should be run without any "right" angles, just smooth flowing bends. The wire is flexible stranded and tinned.
No faceplate required. The product is a finished product, ready to be mounted. The ready indicator (a green led) is visible on the front of the unit.
It mounts in a knockout on the side of your main breaker box. There are also models that mount like a 220v breaker right in your box, however, they don't have as much protection (2720 joules) as this external mount suppressor, typically about 1520 joules.
15A 240v is the minimum size breaker
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answer 2
Asked by
THDCustomerService
Atlanta, GA
December 28, 2011
Hi Bill,

Thank you for your question.

I did reach out to the manufacturer and here is their response to your question.

"The lead length is approximately 14”.
The unit is designed to be mounted directly to the outside of the load center via the nipple (as seen in the picture).
There is no other mounting method or enclosure for it.
Please Log into to www.geindustrial.com and in upper right google corner type in thsasurge60 for more information".

Hope this helps.
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answer 3
Asked by
Dennis
July 2, 2013
The shorter the wires and the fewer bends, the better. There is no faceplate. The device mounts directly to the circuit box through a standard 1/2 inch knockout hole with supplied jam nuts. I believe the breaker range required is 20 to 60 amps.
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Question

Can the unit be wired to an existing breaker or does it have to be a dedicated breaker?

Asked by
Brad
Charlestown, WV.
about SurgePro Surge Arrestor on
December 23, 2011
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answer 1
Asked by
KeithJM
Albany, NY, USA
February 10, 2012
The directions specify a dedicated breaker. I wired mine to a 50a breaker that feeds a welder receptacle in my garage. The receptacle is unused 99.999% of the time. They probably want a dedicated breaker because if the breaker trips, you won't have any protection.
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answer 2
Asked by
les5356
Maple Valley, WA, USA
February 22, 2012
Per the directions, it should be wired to a dedicated breaker. From my understanding most local electrical codes do not allow bunching up on breakers.
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answer 3
Asked by
Bill
Washington
December 29, 2011
Everything I have read indicates a "dedicated" two pole breaker. The speed that the surge protector responds to a spike is much faster than the breakers speed to respond to overcurrent. The surge or spike should be gone when and if the breaker trips, which it is likely to do because the protector will continue to conduct after the spike and require replacement. I do not know the electrical reason for the dedicated breaker other than it is unlikely that you will be unprotected because a breaker tripped. If you use a branch circuit breaker and it is switched off or trips your protection is disconnected. The idea of the surge device is to bridge the current carrying conductors to a grounded conductor.
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Question

Does Unit require power? What are the spec's for the power if required?

Asked by
Tom
New Hampshire
about SurgePro Surge Arrestor on
September 28, 2011
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answer 1
Asked by
KeithJM
Albany, NY, USA
February 10, 2012
The unit does not use any power. It requires a breaker to connect it across the 240v main at your main breaker panel. It operates by clamping over-voltages to 600v line to ground, or 1000v line to line (240v). It is a third generation design and operates in less than 1 nanosecond.
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answer 2
Asked by
Newf
Schaumburg, IL
September 30, 2011
Hello Tom, I’m Newf from the Home Depot’s how-to Community. Thank you for your question.

The THSASURGE60 connects to a 2 pole 30 amp or less dedicated circuit breaker and can be mounted on the outside of any brand name load center. The actual power usage of this item is virtually nil.

I hope this helps,
Newf.
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answer 3
Asked by
Bill
Washington
January 17, 2012
The LED status indicator does consume but the amount is so small it is not worth concern. Otherwise the answer is no, the unit does not consume power. At normal voltage the unit does not conduct. As voltage rises resistance to the flow of electrons within the surge protector decreases. It is connected to both ungrounded legs of power into your panel as well as the neutral (grounded current carrying conductor - white wire) and grounded non current carrying conductor - green (carries fault current in case of short). No current flows through the device unless voltage rises above normal. The device conducts only when voltage is above normal to route it away from other electrical devices connected to the electrical system.
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Question

Installation instructions for GE Surge Protector Model # THSASURGE60

Asked by
Ed
Port Charlotte Fl
about SurgePro Surge Arrestor on
August 30, 2011
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answer 1
Asked by
Newf
Schaumburg, IL
September 2, 2011
Hello Ed, I’m Newf from the Home Depot’s how-to Community. Thank you for your question.

To view installation instructions, see this site:
http://www.geindustrial.com/publibrary/checkout/DET-734?TNR=Brochures|DET-734|generic

I hope this helps,
Newf.
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answer 2
Asked by
KeithJM
Albany, NY, USA
February 10, 2012
If you Google GE SurgePro and go to the GE website, you can download the specs for the unit. It mounts in a spare knockout on the side of your power panel, with a pigtail (about 18") to connect it to a 240v 15a or larger (up to 50a) breaker and the ground and neutral bus. There are models available that mount in place of a breaker, however, they do not have as much capacity. 2720 joules for this unit against 1520 joules for the internal circuit breaker style mount.
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answer 3
Asked by
Bill
Washington
January 17, 2012
Good product but not well represented in installation and specs. Here is some info: For single phase load center. Do not select this product if panel is greater than 400A or short circuit capacity is greater than 65,000A. You must have panel space for a 2 pole breaker. The breaker must be greater than 15A, but not more than 60A. Do not lengthen the protector's pigtail wires. Do not fold wires in tight bends. Best way: mount to side of panel through knock out hole. With breaker OFF trim and connect green and white conductors to ground & neutral bars. Connect black conductors to designated breaker. Turn breaker on and check for green LED. In case wall is finished around panel I'm including photo of install with flush mounted panel. Note: Arrestor speed is somewhat compromised if conductors make tight turns.
Specs:
H 3.5", W 2.875", D 3.25" Knockout hole for nipple 0.5"
Surge current 60,000 A
Response time < 1 nano second
Clamping voltage 600V
Protection L-N, L-G, N-G, L-L
Status indicator LED
Indoor use only
Transient energy rating 2720 joules
Hope this helps.
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